TRC #550: Did NBA’er Manute Bol Coin ‘My Bad’? + Unmarried People Happier? + Fortnite Vs The Doppler Effect

Cristina kicks off the show with a basketball related myth in honour of her beloved Toronto Raptors; did NBA legend Manute Bol really coin the phrase ‘My Bad’? As the only TRC co-host who is not married, Darren scrutinizes an article citing research that suggests unmarried people are happier, probably just to rub it in. Finally, Adam vents his Fornite pet peeve that the game just doesn’t get the Doppler Effect.

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Did NBA’er Manute Bol Coin ‘My Bad’?

Boing Boing: Manute Bol’s Legacy

Deadspin: Did Manute Bol coin the phrase my bad

UPENN Language Log

Wiki: Manute Bol

Wiki: Muggsy Bogues

Washington Post: Manute Bol and my bad

Unmarried People Happier?

The Guardian

Gray Kimbrough on Twitter

Institute for Family Studies – Nicholas Wolfinger

Fortnite Vs The Doppler Effect

What Is The Doppler Effect? – 5 Minutes with an Astronomer

[Self] The speed of the bus in fortnite does not match the speed it should have, according to the doppler effect – r/theydidthemath on Reddit

Fortnite Vinder Bus (Fortnite Battle Royale) – Gaming Sound Effect (HD) | Sound Effects– YouTube

Fortnite Battle Bus Jump Sound – YouTube

Doppler effect – Wikipedia

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3 Responses to TRC #550: Did NBA’er Manute Bol Coin ‘My Bad’? + Unmarried People Happier? + Fortnite Vs The Doppler Effect

  1. Hi folks, this is undoubtedly not something to bother correcting on the show but I thought I’d do my duty as an instructor of freshman composition and a sometimes-linguist on a couple points of pronunciation in TRC 550. (Unless you were speaking Ontarioan).

    1) “Longitude” — usually pronounced with a sound, like LON-ji-tude, not long-ih-tude.
    2) “Jibe/jive” — when something doesn’t agree with something else, it is said that it doesn’t “jibe with” the other thing (not “jive with.”) (see Merriam-Webster ‘jibe’)

    And from Grammarist: Gibe, jibe, jive

    refers to a taunt or a derisive remark. It functions as both a verb (to taunt) and a noun (taunt). has a nautical use (relating to turning the sail to go on an opposite tack), but it’s most often used to mean agree or to be in accord.

    refers to either jazz music, dancing, or nonsense talk, although it can sound old-fashioned or ironic in its senses unrelated to dance.

    M-W goes on to say:
    People began confusing ‘jive’ and ‘jibe’almost immediately after ‘jive’ entered our language in the late 1920s. In particular, jive is often used as a variant for the sense of jibe meaning “agree,” as in “that doesn’t jive with my memory of what happened.” This use of jive, although increasingly common, is widely considered to be an error. Jibe, however, is accepted as a variant spelling of an entirely different word, which is gibe (“to utter taunting words”).

    Regards,
    Long time listener
    Jim VEE-deffer

  2. [looks like my bold-face typography got dropped out, so here it is again]

    Hi folks, this is undoubtedly not something to bother correcting on the show but I thought I’d do my duty as an instructor of freshman composition and a sometimes-linguist on a couple points of pronunciation in TRC 550. (Unless you were speaking Ontarioan).

    1) “Longitude” — usually pronounced with a sound, like LON-ji-tude, not long-ih-tude.
    2) “Jibe/jive” — when something doesn’t agree with something else, it is said that it doesn’t “jibe with” the other thing (not “jive with.”) (see Merriam-Webster ‘jibe’)

    And from Grammarist: Gibe, jibe, jive

    ‘Gibe’ refers to a taunt or a derisive remark. It functions as both a verb (to taunt) and a noun (taunt). ‘Jibe’ has a nautical use (relating to turning the sail to go on an opposite tack), but it’s most often used to mean agree or to be in accord.

    ‘Jive’ refers to either jazz music, dancing, or nonsense talk, although it can sound old-fashioned or ironic in its senses unrelated to dance.

    M-W goes on to say:
    People began confusing ‘jive’ and ‘jibe’almost immediately after ‘jive’ entered our language in the late 1920s. In particular, jive is often used as a variant for the sense of jibe meaning “agree,” as in “that doesn’t jive with my memory of what happened.” This use of jive, although increasingly common, is widely considered to be an error. Jibe, however, is accepted as a variant spelling of an entirely different word, which is gibe (“to utter taunting words”).

  3. Isaac says:

    One look at the episode title and I knew which TRCer was doing which segment. Basketball, happiness, and pop culture? Christina, Darren, and Adam. Not that I have you all pigeonholed, or anything

    Good episode, you all!

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